/page/2

#classic

(Source: Spotify)

imwithkanye:

The Alarming Use Of Homophobic Language On Twitter

The Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services (iSMSS) at the University of Alberta launched NoHomophobes.com to track the use of gay slurs on Twitter… Faggot is tweeted ”an average of nearly 1 million times per month, or over 10 million times a year.”

[via: buzzfeedlgbt]

imwithkanye:

The Alarming Use Of Homophobic Language On Twitter

The Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services (iSMSS) at the University of Alberta launched NoHomophobes.com to track the use of gay slurs on Twitter… Faggot is tweeted ”an average of nearly 1 million times per month, or over 10 million times a year.”

[via: buzzfeedlgbt]

nicolecrooz:

sukideen:

James Deen photographed by Danielle Levitt for GQ 

Unf James Deen

(via ayanaphil)

burnedshoes:

Happy Birthday Mohandas Karamchand “Mahatma” Gandhi!
Thanks to Julia for reminding me!
“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” (Mahatma Gandhi)

© Margaret Bourke-White, 1946, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi working at a spinning wheel
The spinning wheel, a device used to make yarn or thread came to symbolize the notion of Indian self-sufficiency — and thus independence from British rule. This symbolism is also part of the Flag of India:

   © India Post, The first stamp of independent India, released on 21 Nov 1947
Before Margaret Bourke-White was allowed to photograph Gandhi, she was informed she would need to learn the spinning wheel - it’s said that she caught on quickly.
She was a friend to Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi; in fact, she was the last person to interview him hours before his assassination in January 1948. It’s hardly surprising, really, that Bourke-White would be drawn to a figure like Gandhi. After all, for her entire career, she focused her lens on the human side of any issue — no matter how brutal or unsettling the subject matter — and Gandhi’s emphasis on liberty and dignity in the face of savage resistance spoke directly to her own passion for both justice and for adventure.
(similar post | more photos and information here)

(self-reblog)

burnedshoes:

Happy Birthday Mohandas Karamchand “Mahatma” Gandhi!

Thanks to Julia for reminding me!

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” (Mahatma Gandhi)

© Margaret Bourke-White, 1946, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi working at a spinning wheel

The spinning wheel, a device used to make yarn or thread came to symbolize the notion of Indian self-sufficiency — and thus independence from British rule. This symbolism is also part of the Flag of India:

   © India Post, The first stamp of independent India, released on 21 Nov 1947

Before Margaret Bourke-White was allowed to photograph Gandhi, she was informed she would need to learn the spinning wheel - it’s said that she caught on quickly.

She was a friend to Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi; in fact, she was the last person to interview him hours before his assassination in January 1948. It’s hardly surprising, really, that Bourke-White would be drawn to a figure like Gandhi. After all, for her entire career, she focused her lens on the human side of any issue — no matter how brutal or unsettling the subject matter — and Gandhi’s emphasis on liberty and dignity in the face of savage resistance spoke directly to her own passion for both justice and for adventure.

(similar post | more photos and information here)

(self-reblog)

(Source: burnedshoes, via burnedshoes)

Soundtrack of my life.

(Source: Spotify)

#Ink #drawing. I always struggled with drawing cartoons, just practice. (Taken with Instagram)

#Ink #drawing. I always struggled with drawing cartoons, just practice. (Taken with Instagram)

Finally got to see Erykah in concert!! W/ the birthday boy @hellospaceboy / @mallit18 good times.   (Taken with Instagram)

Finally got to see Erykah in concert!! W/ the birthday boy @hellospaceboy / @mallit18 good times. (Taken with Instagram)

(Source: Spotify)

(Source: Spotify)

burnedshoes:

© Grey Villet, 1971, Gay rights event

In late 1971, two years after the Stonewall riots in New York sparked the modern gay rights movement in America, and twelve months before LIFE ceased publishing as a weekly, the magazine featured an article on “gay liberation” that, seen a full 40 years later, feels sensational, measured and somehow endearingly, deeply square all at the same time.

For its part, LIFE introduced its 1971 feature in language that certainly feels more “Us vs. Them” than what we might see in a similar article today, but it’s also language that, four decades on, has about it a sense of an old world trying — really trying — to get a handle on the new:

It was the most shocking and, to most Americans, the most surprising liberation movement yet. Under the slogan “Out of the closets and into the streets,” thousands of homosexuals, male and female, were proudly confessing what they had long hidden. They were, moreover, moving into direct confrontation with conventional society. Their battle was far from won. But in 1971 militant homosexuals showed they they were prepared to fight it…They resent what they consider to be savage discrimination against them on the basis of a preference which they did not choose and which they cannot — and do not want to — change. And while mist will admit that “straight” society’s attitudes have caused them unhappiness, they respond to the charge that all homosexuals are guilt-ridden and miserable with the defiant rallying cry “Gay is Good!” (read more)

(Source: burnedshoes)

missfolly:

Louis Armstrong plays for his wife in front of the Sphinx by the pyramids in Giza, 1961

missfolly:

Louis Armstrong plays for his wife in front of the Sphinx by the pyramids in Giza, 1961

(via theeducatedfieldnegro)

(Source: illestcunts, via shahka)

#classic

(Source: Spotify)

imwithkanye:

The Alarming Use Of Homophobic Language On Twitter

The Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services (iSMSS) at the University of Alberta launched NoHomophobes.com to track the use of gay slurs on Twitter… Faggot is tweeted ”an average of nearly 1 million times per month, or over 10 million times a year.”

[via: buzzfeedlgbt]

imwithkanye:

The Alarming Use Of Homophobic Language On Twitter

The Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services (iSMSS) at the University of Alberta launched NoHomophobes.com to track the use of gay slurs on Twitter… Faggot is tweeted ”an average of nearly 1 million times per month, or over 10 million times a year.”

[via: buzzfeedlgbt]

nicolecrooz:

sukideen:

James Deen photographed by Danielle Levitt for GQ 

Unf James Deen

(via ayanaphil)

burnedshoes:

Happy Birthday Mohandas Karamchand “Mahatma” Gandhi!
Thanks to Julia for reminding me!
“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” (Mahatma Gandhi)

© Margaret Bourke-White, 1946, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi working at a spinning wheel
The spinning wheel, a device used to make yarn or thread came to symbolize the notion of Indian self-sufficiency — and thus independence from British rule. This symbolism is also part of the Flag of India:

   © India Post, The first stamp of independent India, released on 21 Nov 1947
Before Margaret Bourke-White was allowed to photograph Gandhi, she was informed she would need to learn the spinning wheel - it’s said that she caught on quickly.
She was a friend to Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi; in fact, she was the last person to interview him hours before his assassination in January 1948. It’s hardly surprising, really, that Bourke-White would be drawn to a figure like Gandhi. After all, for her entire career, she focused her lens on the human side of any issue — no matter how brutal or unsettling the subject matter — and Gandhi’s emphasis on liberty and dignity in the face of savage resistance spoke directly to her own passion for both justice and for adventure.
(similar post | more photos and information here)

(self-reblog)

burnedshoes:

Happy Birthday Mohandas Karamchand “Mahatma” Gandhi!

Thanks to Julia for reminding me!

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” (Mahatma Gandhi)

© Margaret Bourke-White, 1946, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi working at a spinning wheel

The spinning wheel, a device used to make yarn or thread came to symbolize the notion of Indian self-sufficiency — and thus independence from British rule. This symbolism is also part of the Flag of India:

   © India Post, The first stamp of independent India, released on 21 Nov 1947

Before Margaret Bourke-White was allowed to photograph Gandhi, she was informed she would need to learn the spinning wheel - it’s said that she caught on quickly.

She was a friend to Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi; in fact, she was the last person to interview him hours before his assassination in January 1948. It’s hardly surprising, really, that Bourke-White would be drawn to a figure like Gandhi. After all, for her entire career, she focused her lens on the human side of any issue — no matter how brutal or unsettling the subject matter — and Gandhi’s emphasis on liberty and dignity in the face of savage resistance spoke directly to her own passion for both justice and for adventure.

(similar post | more photos and information here)

(self-reblog)

(Source: burnedshoes, via burnedshoes)

Soundtrack of my life.

(Source: Spotify)

#Ink #drawing. I always struggled with drawing cartoons, just practice. (Taken with Instagram)

#Ink #drawing. I always struggled with drawing cartoons, just practice. (Taken with Instagram)

Finally got to see Erykah in concert!! W/ the birthday boy @hellospaceboy / @mallit18 good times.   (Taken with Instagram)

Finally got to see Erykah in concert!! W/ the birthday boy @hellospaceboy / @mallit18 good times. (Taken with Instagram)

(Source: Spotify)

(Source: Spotify)

burnedshoes:

© Grey Villet, 1971, Gay rights event

In late 1971, two years after the Stonewall riots in New York sparked the modern gay rights movement in America, and twelve months before LIFE ceased publishing as a weekly, the magazine featured an article on “gay liberation” that, seen a full 40 years later, feels sensational, measured and somehow endearingly, deeply square all at the same time.

For its part, LIFE introduced its 1971 feature in language that certainly feels more “Us vs. Them” than what we might see in a similar article today, but it’s also language that, four decades on, has about it a sense of an old world trying — really trying — to get a handle on the new:

It was the most shocking and, to most Americans, the most surprising liberation movement yet. Under the slogan “Out of the closets and into the streets,” thousands of homosexuals, male and female, were proudly confessing what they had long hidden. They were, moreover, moving into direct confrontation with conventional society. Their battle was far from won. But in 1971 militant homosexuals showed they they were prepared to fight it…They resent what they consider to be savage discrimination against them on the basis of a preference which they did not choose and which they cannot — and do not want to — change. And while mist will admit that “straight” society’s attitudes have caused them unhappiness, they respond to the charge that all homosexuals are guilt-ridden and miserable with the defiant rallying cry “Gay is Good!” (read more)

(Source: burnedshoes)

missfolly:

Louis Armstrong plays for his wife in front of the Sphinx by the pyramids in Giza, 1961

missfolly:

Louis Armstrong plays for his wife in front of the Sphinx by the pyramids in Giza, 1961

(via theeducatedfieldnegro)

when I feel the need to politely express my feelings about tiny changes

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living is an art form.

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